On Friday, December 30, 2016, the IRS and Treasury Department released over 600 pages of new final, temporary and proposed regulations under Chapter 4 (FATCA), Chapter 3, and Chapter 61 (see earlier coverage).  The four packages finalize the temporary regulations issued in 2014 and make additional changes based on comments received by the IRS.  One issue addressed by the temporary FATCA coordination regulations issues under Chapter 3 addresses the outstanding question of whether withholding agents must document the foreign payees of U.S. source gross transportation income (USSGTI) and withhold under Chapter 3.  The temporary regulations amend the regulations under Section 1441 to specifically exempt USSGTI from amounts subject to withholding.

Although it informally suggested that withholding agents were not required to document or withhold 30% on payments of USSGTI, the IRS has been reluctant to issue formal guidance.  To this end, IRS Publication 515 provides that such amounts are not subject to Chapter 3 withholding under Section 1441 or 1442.  However, Sections 1441 and 1442 generally require withholding agents to withhold 30% on payments subject to the tax imposed by Sections 871 and 881 (i.e., FDAP income).  However, payments of gross transportation income that is U.S. source because the transportation begin or ends (not both) in the United States are subject to a 4% excise tax under Section 887 that is self-imposed by the payee, unless an exception applies.  Section 887(c) provides that the 30% gross tax applicable to most U.S. source income of foreign persons (other than income effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business) does not apply to transportation income.

The issue that has arisen is that neither Section 1441 or 1442 explicitly reference Sections 871 and 881 as a basis for the withholding.  However, it seems illogical to require 30% withholding on U.S. source gross transportation income given that such income is only subject to the 4% excise tax.  Despite the guidance in Publication 515, examiners have asserted on audit that such payments are subject to withholding under Chapter 3.  Nevertheless, withholding agents have generally been successful in rebutting such assertions and avoiding audit assessments.

The IRS created confusion regarding this issue earlier in 2016 when it asserted in a practice unit that USSGTI did not constitute FDAP income and was therefore not subject to withholding under Chapter 3.  The IRS later revised the practice unit to remove the reference to USSGTI after taxpayers questioned whether such payments are FDAP income.  The preamble to the temporary regulations now clarify that although USSGTI is FDAP income, it is nonetheless not subject to Chapter 3 withholding because the tax imposed under Section 871 or 881 does not apply.  The temporary regulations now thankfully bring this saga to a close six years after the IRS Information Reporting Program Advisory Committee made its original request for the IRS to clarify this problem for withholding agents in 2010.  A discussion of this issue can be found in IRPAC’s 2013 annual report.

Photo of Michael M. Lloyd Michael M. Lloyd

Michael Lloyd practices in the areas of tax and employee benefits with a focus on information reporting and withholding on cross-border payments (e.g., Forms 1042 and 1042-S) and Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), backup withholding, employment taxation, the treatment of fringe benefits…

Michael Lloyd practices in the areas of tax and employee benefits with a focus on information reporting and withholding on cross-border payments (e.g., Forms 1042 and 1042-S) and Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), backup withholding, employment taxation, the treatment of fringe benefits, cross-border compensation, domestic information reporting (e.g., Forms W-2, 1099, 1095 series returns), penalty abatement, and general tax planning and controversy matters. Mr. Lloyd advises large U.S. and foreign multinationals regarding compliance with information reporting and withholding issues, as well as a range of other federal and state tax issues.

Photo of S. Michael Chittenden S. Michael Chittenden

Michael Chittenden practices in the areas of tax and employee benefits with a focus on the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), information reporting (e.g., Forms 1095, 1096, 1098, 1099, W-2, 1042, and 1042-S) and withholding, payroll taxes, and fringe benefits. Mr. Chittenden…

Michael Chittenden practices in the areas of tax and employee benefits with a focus on the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), information reporting (e.g., Forms 1095, 1096, 1098, 1099, W-2, 1042, and 1042-S) and withholding, payroll taxes, and fringe benefits. Mr. Chittenden advises companies on their obligations under FATCA and assists in the development of comprehensive FATCA and Chapter 3 (nonresident alien reporting and withholding) compliance programs.

Mr. Chittenden advises large employers on their employment tax obligations, including the special FICA and FUTA rules for nonqualified deferred compensation, the successor employer rules, the voluntary correction of employment tax mistakes, and the abatement of late deposit and information reporting penalties. In addition, he has also advised large insurance companies and employers on the Affordable Care Act reporting requirements in Sections 6055 and 6056, and advised clients on the application of section 6050W (Form 1099-K reporting), including its application to third-party payment networks.

Mr. Chittenden counsels clients on mobile workforce issues including state income tax withholding for mobile employees and expatriate and inpatriate taxation and reporting.

Mr. Chittenden is a frequent commentator on information withholding, payroll taxes, and fringe benefits and regularly gives presentations on the compliance burdens for companies.